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TRACK OUTCOMES: State of Social Procurement webinar series (1 hr)
Part 4 of the State of Social Procurement in Australia and New Zealand webinar series asks how could organisations and for benefit suppliers measure the social outcomes of their purchase and supply activities?

May 19, 2022 01:00 PM in Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney

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Speakers

Host | Alison Carter
Social Impact Manager @IPA Personnel
Alison Carter is the Social Impact Manager for IPA. She also supports the social impact activities of the employment services and training divisions of the larger genU Group. Alison's focus is on designing initiatives and measurement frameworks for workforce solutions that drive social impact. Alison is an experienced social entrepreneur with professional experience in stakeholder engagement, advocacy and strategic communication roles in Australia and internationally.
Sean Barnes
Director | Social Procurement @Akina Foundation
Dr Seán Barnes is the Director of Social Procurement with the Ākina Foundation, NZ’s leading impact development organisation. Seán established and leads Ākina’s specialist social procurement programme that provides advisory support to private and public sector buyers, as well as supporting impact-led enterprises to grow and take advantage of increasing market opportunities. He was also recently named 2021 Procurement Professional of the Year by the Procurement Excellence Forum. Seán is driven by changing procurement for good and realising the potential of organisations to have a positive influence on society and the environment. Seán is a Chartered Member of Engineering NZ and holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering.
Rita Koritsas
Sales and Marketing Manager @Jacaranda Industries
Rita Koritsas leads the strategic and social procurement policy development and capabilities of Jacaranda Industries, a Corio-based supplier of commercial joinery.
Daniel Briggs
Founder and Director @Yurringa
Daniel Briggs’ extensive legal and business experience has afforded him great social, economic and community insight. While working as a criminal lawyer, Daniel, a Yorta Yorta and Wemba Wemba man realised the justice system was effectively crisis intervention. He wanted to contribute to the Indigenous and broader communities in a different way, by engaging in business and economic development. Daniel established Yurringa to enter the commercial market as not only a business opportunity, but as way of giving back to the community. He sees community re-investment as an opportunity for increasing Indigenous employment, authentic inclusiveness and career development in Australian businesses. Daniel measures success by the respect earnt and trust in his integrity. This is a core value which is central to Yurringa.